Monthly Archives: April 2015

Ghostly and Mournful Mists

The Voice in the Night  by William Hope Hodgson (1907)

Tuesday’s Tale of Terror    April 28, 2015

//
“It was a dark, starless night. We were becalmed in the Northern Pacific.”

 Ghost-ship

So opens this sea adventure into a lurking and mysterious world. We have two sailors in a schooner in the Pacific. It’s dark and misty and they are unsure of their position. A singular voice—inhuman but throaty—comes across the sea. Poor soul, is he shipwrecked and starving? That may be true and much more as unknown forces descend and this nautical yarn unravels. What greater horror is there than to be stranded in the dark ocean with weird powers lurking? This atmospheric tale was adapted into a 1963 film (The Attack of the Mushroom People) and was an episode in the TV series Suspicion in 1958. The story originally appeared in The Blue Book Magazine in 1907.

5182474854_a0a03b189b

 

//

images

 

 

William  Hope Hodgson is considered to be the famous but forgotten master of cosmic horror.  He is well known for his occult detective Thomas Carnacki in the novel The Whistling Room, and for numerous stories of weird, fantastic, and science fiction. H.P. Lovecraft said that Hodgson “was second only to Algernon Blackwood in his serious treatment of unreality.”

Are you a fan of the unreality?blue_book_1907-11-redux

 

 

 

Read the full text at Gaslight.mtroyal.ca

 

 

Listen to the audio at Pseudopod.org.

 

Advertisements

4 Comments

Filed under classic horror stories, fiction, ghost ships, ghost stories, short stories, supernatural, tales of terror

Contagion of Evil in the Air

A Short Trip Home  by F. Scott Fitzgerald  (1927)

 

Tuesday’s Tale of Terror    April 21, 2015

images

We are in Fitzgerald’s radiant world of a Cotillion Club dance, raccoon coats and high-buttoned shoes, chauffeurs, trains, and billiard palours. So what’s a ghost story doing here? And a story with a slash of glamour instead of the dark and dreary? A Short Trip Home is not one of Fitzgerald’s most notable short stories like The Ice Palace or Benjamin Button. Why would Fitzgerald want to write a ghost story? I’ll let you stab a guess after you read this odd but entertaining adventure.

gatsby-car

Eddie is our narrator, a college sophomore, home on Christmas break. He is falling for the romantic Ellen Baker, described as having a “bewitchment.” When a thin-faced man in a derby hat appears, poor Ellen becomes dazed by him. Maybe it’s his “air of being scarred” or his sinister but soundless huffy laugh. Whatever, Eddie is determined to save the mesmerized Ellen from this stranger and decides to find out exactly who the man is.Shadow_Ghosts_hat_man_221456784 250x200

 

Some critics speculate that Fitzgerald was trying to imitate Poe with this first person narrative. I found the story to be more Hitchcockian. What do you think?

2940015856224_p0_v1_s260x420

 

 

Read A Short Trip Home at Gutenberg.net.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

Bibliophilica       Lovecraft Ezine     HorrorAddicts.net  

Horror Novel Reviews    Hell Horror    HorrorPalace

HorrorSociety.com        Sirens Call Publications

 Monster Librarian   Tales to Terrify       Spooky Reads

HorrorNews.net     HorrorTalk.com

 Rob Around Books     The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free Tales of Terror classic authors.

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, ghost stories, horror, horror blogs, literary horror, quiet horror, short stories, supernatural, tales of terror

In the Murky Twilight

Smoke Ghost  by Fritz Leiber (1941)

Tuesday’s Tale of Terror   April 14, 2015

 

smokeghosts168x300

Robert Aickman (supernatural fiction author) said that a successful ghost story must open a door where no one else had seen a door to exist, and then at the end of the story, leave that door open.

In Smoke Ghost by Leiber, Catesby Wran is an advertising executive sitting in his office and chatting about ghosts with his secretary Miss Millick. Not a ghost from books, Mr. Wran explains, “the kind that would haunt coal-yards and slip around at night through deserted office buildings like this one. A real ghost.”

Miss Millick knows there’s no such thing as a ghost and “science and psychiatry all go to prove it.” Who wouldn’t agree with that? On his way home, Mr. Wran is riding the elevated train past rooftops and smoky brick buildings. He sees an abandoned shapeless black sack on the rooftop… and a face in the murky twilight.

imgres

Do you think there is a supernatural edge between the alienated  feelings we have and the unexplained sources of ghosts? And perhaps that door that remains open.


FLeiber

 

 

Fritz Lieber’s fiction was highly influenced by Lovecraft and Carl Jung. He was a poet, playwright, and actor. He has written novels, novellas, and over 100 short stories.

ladyofdarknessimages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the short story Smoke Ghost at UNZ.org .

 

images

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

Bibliophilica       Lovecraft Ezine     HorrorAddicts.net  

Horror Novel Reviews    Hell Horror    HorrorPalace

HorrorSociety.com        Sirens Call Publications

Monster Librarian   Tales to Terrify       Spooky Reads

HorrorNews.net     HorrorTalk.com

Rob Around Books     The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free Tales of Terror classic authors.

2 Comments

Filed under classic horror stories, fiction, ghost stories, Ghosts, horror, horror blogs, psychological horror, short stories, supernatural