Ghostly and Mournful Mists

The Voice in the Night  by William Hope Hodgson (1907)

Tuesday’s Tale of Terror    April 28, 2015

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“It was a dark, starless night. We were becalmed in the Northern Pacific.”

 Ghost-ship

So opens this sea adventure into a lurking and mysterious world. We have two sailors in a schooner in the Pacific. It’s dark and misty and they are unsure of their position. A singular voice—inhuman but throaty—comes across the sea. Poor soul, is he shipwrecked and starving? That may be true and much more as unknown forces descend and this nautical yarn unravels. What greater horror is there than to be stranded in the dark ocean with weird powers lurking? This atmospheric tale was adapted into a 1963 film (The Attack of the Mushroom People) and was an episode in the TV series Suspicion in 1958. The story originally appeared in The Blue Book Magazine in 1907.

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William  Hope Hodgson is considered to be the famous but forgotten master of cosmic horror.  He is well known for his occult detective Thomas Carnacki in the novel The Whistling Room, and for numerous stories of weird, fantastic, and science fiction. H.P. Lovecraft said that Hodgson “was second only to Algernon Blackwood in his serious treatment of unreality.”

Are you a fan of the unreality?blue_book_1907-11-redux

 

 

 

Read the full text at Gaslight.mtroyal.ca

 

 

Listen to the audio at Pseudopod.org.

 

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4 Comments

Filed under classic horror stories, fiction, ghost ships, ghost stories, short stories, supernatural, tales of terror

4 responses to “Ghostly and Mournful Mists

  1. Love learning about these things. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I tackled one of Hodgson’s longer nautical adventures for my Halloween “moldy oldie” a few years back: http://sillyverse.com/2013/10/31/review-william-hope-hodgson-the-ghost-pirates-1909/

    Liked by 1 person

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