Category Archives: Greylock

Gaiman’s Black Cave Truth in a Mountain

 The Truth is a Black Cave in a Mountain  by Neil Gaiman (2014)

 

Tuesday’s Tale of Terror   January 17, 2017

 

gaimanthetruthisacaveintheblackmountains

 

Are you a dark fantasy or speculative fiction fan? Dark fantasy is not horror, not ghostly, but explores dark emotions, the psychological, and often paranormal worlds and creatures.  Fantasy is the language of dreams. It has become a popular frontier in storytelling these days. Game of Thrones comes to mind, right? And of course, The Odyssey full of mythical creatures, sirens, and witches.  Today, prepare yourself to shift into another realm in this short story The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains.

Mountains hold silence, silver skies and green earth. What a vast splendor. To stand on a mountain is to stand apart from all men and be inside the heart of nature. I felt that way when I climbed Mt. Greylock to research my novel.  As if I could climb skyward on the ladder of clouds, I wanted to feel its power.  John Muir says “Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.” But there can be darkness too, spiky-edged shadows and brooding whispers. And unawakened eyes.

 

images

 

Two men embark on a journey in what appears to be the Scottish terrain. There are secrets here. And magic. And a skull. Come into the dark fantasy world of Neil Gaiman.

The truth is a cave in the black mountains.  And maybe gold is hidden here too. There is one way there, and that way is treacherous, and if you choose the wrong path you will die alone on the mountainside.

The two walked on and into the Misty Isle. The mountains were black and grey against the white of the sky. Eagles circled.

“I see death in your past and death in your future.”

“Death waits in all our futures,” I said.

Something was there. Something was waiting.

 

maxresdefault

 

The part fable and part fairy tale brings you shadows,  regret, vengeance, and, ultimately love.

 

Read the FREE short story here at FiftyTwoStories.com

p039nxcx

 

p02gvbk4

Neil Gaiman  is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels Neverwhere (1995), Stardust (1999), the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning American Gods (2001), Anansi Boys (2005), and Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett, 1990), as well as the short story collections Smoke and Mirrors (1998) and Fragile Things (2006).  His The Graveyard Book  won the UK’s Booktrust Prize for Teenage Fiction, the Newbery Medal, and the Hugo Best Novel Prize.

His first collection of short fiction, Smoke and Mirrors: Short Fictions and Illusions, was nominated for the UK’s MacMillan Silver Pen Awards as the best short story collection of the year.

 

“May your coming year be filled with magic and dreams and good madness.”  Neil Gaiman.

 

 

 

MORE TALES OF TERROR

15940742_1231316186946636_7134412461241915755_n

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free Tales of Terror. This is a compendium of nearly 200 short stories by over 100 master storytellers of mystery,  supernatural, horror, and ghost stories. Join me in reading one short story every other week! Comments are welcome.

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

The Kill Zone

Kirkus Mystery & Thrillers Reviews

Books & Such   Bibliophilica    Lovecraft Ezine   Parlor of Horror

HorrorNews.net   Fangoria.com   

Slattery’s Art of Horror Magazine

HorrorAddicts.net     Horror Novel Reviews    HorrorSociety.com     

Monster Librarian     HorrorTalk.com 

 Rob Around Books      The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

EZindiepublishing

Thriller Author Mark Dawson http://markjdawson.com/

Dawson’s Book Marketing site: http://www.selfpublishingformula.com/

 

5 Comments

Filed under dark fantasy, fiction, ghost story blogs, Greylock, horror blogs, Mt. Greylock, psychological horror, short stories, short story blogs, skulls, supernatural, supernatural thrillers, tales of terror

Review of Greylock – Five Stars from Don Sloan

Five Stars from Veteran Book Reviewer Don Sloan:

“I’ve not seen anything like it since Hitchcock and duMaurier gave us The Birds. Greylock is a stunning masterpiece of innovative horror. Award-winning author Paula Cappa delivers a virtuoso performance in fiction, with characters you’ll care deeply about and sinister evil that will trouble your sleep for a long time to come.

Composer and classical concert pianist Alexei Georg has a dream: to put the music of the beluga whales off Russia’s coast into a musical composition for piano and symphony orchestra. Only two things are stopping him: a shrewish wife and a black apparition that haunts his recent performances. His lover, radio meteorologist Lia Marrs, wants very much to believe that Alexei will be successful in his bid to divorce the diabolical Carole Anne, but his soon-to-be ex-wife has a secret she’s holding over his head — the revelation that his signature composition “October” was, in fact, written over a hundred years earlier by someone else.

He travels to the icy waters where the whales are known to sing their eerie songs, and encounters a female Russian shaman who alternately intrigues him and terrifies him with her enigmatic interpretations.Then, Carole Anne’s murder throws things into turmoil as Alexei, suspected of the crime, flees to remote Mount Greylock, still pursued by the dark phantom.

This inspired story of the creative process, and the lengths to which a composer might go to realize his dream, is at once cautionary and revealing. Who can say what dark muses we all might entreat to achieve our artistic aims and aspirations?

Five well-earned stars to Greylock.”

ChanticleerBadge-2015-Paranormal-CategoryGreylock_thumbnail3PaulaCappa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Print Edition published by Crispin Books.  

Kindle and print editions available on Amazon.com.

5starsimgres

 

1 Comment

Filed under Book Reviews, crime stories, crime thrillers, fiction, Greylock, horror blogs, Mt. Greylock, paranormal, short story blogs, supernatural music, supernatural mysteries, supernatural thrillers

Crispin Books Releases GREYLOCK, Print Edition

Real books are on the rebound. Why? Comprehension and emotional engagement are higher for readers who are reading hard print on the page as compared to ebook readers tracking words across a lit screen. Publishers Weekly reported last year that print books are selling better than ebooks. But I still do love my Kindle.

So, for all you lovers (myself included) of the textural feel of paper-turning action while reading, for all you who savor the swishing of each page as you journey into a story, for all you who admire beautiful book covers on your tables and eye-catching spines on your bookshelves, I’m happy to announce that Crispin Books of Milwaukee, Wisconsin has just launched GREYLOCK in a trade softcover print edition.

Greylock_large3

“Greylock is a stunning mountain, the terrain rolling like a series of hunchbacks with secret clefts.

Makes one wonder what secrets are buried here.” Alexei Georg, Greylock.

 

On Amazon and Barnes & Noble

For booksellers, available at Ingram and Baker & Taylor Book Distributors.

GreylockTablePhotoIMG_0090

 

“Echoing notes of Phantom of the Opera, mixed with Raymond Chandler’s Marlowe, and Peter Straub’s Ghost Story, Greylock is a thrilling musical tragedy steeped in lore, mythology, and the madness of composition, leading to a crescendo of epic proportions. Paula Cappa is a gifted author, and this book will have you swooning in the aisles.” —Richard Thomas, author of Disintegration.

“A smart, entertaining supernatural thriller. Think Stephen King meets Raymond Chandler with a score by Tchaikovsky. Briskly paced, this novel was a genuine pleasure to read.” —David Corbett, award-winning and best-selling author of The Mercy of the Night.

“If you’re looking for an imaginative, sophisticated read, you’ve found it. Five stars.” —Michael Schmicker, best-selling author of The Witch of Napoli.

“Rarely have I come across such an original and well-written story. A unique, expertly written mix of genres that makes for a haunting book.” —Nicholas Rossis, award-winning author of Pearseus.

bookpagesmages

Leave a comment

Filed under fiction, Greylock, horror blogs, Mt. Greylock, short story blogs, supernatural music, supernatural mysteries, supernatural thrillers

Greylock, Semi-Finalist in Kindle Book Awards

Are you a book award watcher? Man Booker, Pulitzer, Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker, Nebula, Feather Quill. Some think we are a prize-obsessed society as we watch the Oscars and the Tony Awards religiously with popcorn and champagne parties. Who will get that seal of excellence for all the public to applaud?

While winning an award is about discovery and networking, exposure certainly, the real benefit of any award, literary or otherwise, indie or international is the encouragement.  How many times does a writer feel like quitting? How many times does a writer say, “Oh, this story is trash. Burn it”? Self-doubt is a familiar state of mind for many writers, myself included. The rigors of fiction, of structure and creativity are constant challenges. We all grow weary from time to time.

So, today, I say ‘yes to the present moment’, as Eckhart Tolle says and share with you a much needed moment of encouragement from the Kindle Book Awards. Winners to be announced in autumn 2016.

Greylock is a semi-finalist in the suspense/horror category. 

KindleBookReviewAwardImage

 

Greylock_thumbnail3PaulaCappa

 

For my author friends here, the link below at The Book Publicist is

a list of 37 literary book awards. Best wishes to all!

The Book Publicist.

 

2 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, fiction, Greylock, horror blogs, Mt. Greylock, Reading Fiction, short story blogs, supernatural music, supernatural mysteries, supernatural thrillers

Melville on Mt. Greylock

Melville in Love, The Secret Life of Melville and the Muse of Moby-Dick

 by Michael Shelden  (2016)

 

BOOK REVIEW

9780062418982

 

Did you know that Herman Melville, author of Moby-Dick (the finest sea-faring novel ever written), climbed Mt. Greylock? In 1851 Melville climbed Mt. Greylock on the trail called Bellows Pipe. This ‘excursion to Greylock’ was by wagon and horses, and on foot. What is most amazing is that he made the climb with his secret lover Mrs. Sarah Moorewood. Sarah was a “wild beauty” who rode a colt named Black Quake. She had a salacious reputation that would make men tremble in her presence.  And Herman Melville fell into her lusty charms.

The excursion to Greylock included a party of ten—family (no spouses) and friends—complete with brandy cherries, champagne, rum, port wine and gallons of enthusiasm. Before sunset they reached the hazy blue, white, and green mountaintop, viewed the watery atmosphere, “the air cool and pungent with the smell of balsam.” After dining by firelight, and under the stars, Herman and Sarah found themselves a private escape and made love for the first time on Greylock’s summit. A night that was “too merry for sleep” as Sarah wrote in her essay some time later.

“They did what would have come naturally to two people in love, taking advantage of the late hour and the darkness to enjoy a passionate bond that had been growing for more than a year.”

I’ve been reading a thrilling biography of Herman Melville, Melville in Love, The Secret Life of Melville and the Muse of Moby-Dick by Michael Sheldon. Of course the scandal in the story is that both Melville and Moorewood were wed to others at the time. Sheldon writes of Melville’s muse, the woman and the mountain. Melville grew obsessed with Sarah, a dark and mysterious beauty just as Ahab grew obsessed with his ghostly white whale. The pursuit, the chase, the desires drove his creativity and his sexuality in a parallel race. This book is a stunning narrative prose that reads like a novel. Impossible to put down, Melville in Love deserves a place on your book shelf right next to Moby-Dick.

housesimages

“Arrowhead” Farmhouse in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.

In writing my own mystery Greylock, which takes place on Mt. Greylock and also deals with whales, I studied about Melville (and other creative artists like Hawthorne and Thoreau who climbed Mt. Greylock) and his years at “Arrowhead,” his farm at the foot of Mt. Greylock, where he wrote Moby-Dick in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He could view Mt. Greylock from his desk by the window, viewing the great slopes in the northern sky every day, writing and writing and writing his masterpiece. But none of the biographies I read pointed to an illicit affair by the author with the sexy and flirtatious Sarah Moorewood who lived nearby in Pittsfield. She was his neighbor, for heaven’s sake.

9360f6fb7d066e0873b4a2df2258c34f

images

 

During the 1850s, Moby-Dick was a commercial disappointment, negative reviews, selling only 3000 copies and earning him just $500. But Melville was truly inspired as he put pen to paper. Melville’s deep and passionate love of Sarah Moorehead with her grace and beauty and intelligence became his muse to write his epic sea drama of the obsessed and mad Ahab in pursuit of his wicked whale. In fact, after Moby-Dick was completed, Melville wrote a scathing love story, Pierre, which reflected his love affair with Sarah.  However, that one proved to be a failure as well.

Biographer Michael Sheldon brings the reader through Melville’s private adventures with rich descriptions; quite fast-paced, this biography is vivid with the emotional life and mindset of Melville. You won’t be disappointed or bored. Not a single page gets tedious.

Herman Melville Website.

////////////////////////////////////////////

SarahMoorewoodimgres

MTE1ODA0OTcxNzIxOTgzNTAx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9780062418982

If you are looking for a delicious summer read where history, literature, and nature are provocative elements, Melville in Love is a mesmerizing portrait of two lovers in a heart-breaking story.

OTHER REVIEWS

“A scandalous surprise… Shelden carefully and convincingly presents his evidence regarding Morewood’s influence and how she inspired Melville to a greatness recognized by few of his peers… This well-paced, enjoyable read is a must for Melville fans.” — Library Journal

“Riveting in its incandescent sense of discovery, intimacy, and velocity, Shelden’s bound-to-be-controversial anatomy of a clandestine love transforms our perception of Melville and introduces “one of the great unsung figures in literary history.” — Booklist, Starred Review

Mt. Greylock, Massachusetts

stony-ledge-2014-11-06-1.jpg.910x680_q95_upscale-False

 

Michael Sheldon is author of 6 biographies,

including the Pulitzer Prize finalist Orwell: The Authorized Biography.


sheldonimgres

11book_CA0-articleInline

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews, fiction, Greylock, literature, Mt. Greylock, mysteries, Reading Fiction, short story blogs

Greylock Wins Chanticleer International Book Award

I’m happy to announce that my mystery Greylock has won a Paranormal Chanticleer International Book Award, 2015.  The category is Supernatural. This is a Blue Ribbon writing competition that has become a champion for emerging and talented authors around the globe. They are partners with the Independent Book Publishers Association, The Alliance of Independent Authors, and The Writer.

 

Greylock_thumbnail3PaulaCappa

Greylock on Amazon

Greylock on Barnes&Noble

Greylock on iBooks

GREYLOCK REVIEW: “If you’re looking for an imaginative, sophisticated read, you’ve found it. Five stars.” —Michael Schmicker, best-selling author of The Witch of Napoli.

 

The Witch of Napoli is also a Chanticleer Winner this year in the Historical Paranormal Category. I share congratulations with Mike Schmicker! Readers here who love the paranormal will find his novel to be one of the best.

Mike Schmicker is an award-winning author, an investigative journalist, nationally-known writer on scientific anomalies and the paranormal, and Amazon Top 100 author. He is the co-author of “The Gift, ESP: The Extraordinary Experiences of Ordinary People” (St. Martin’s Press (USA)/Penguin Random House (UK). His first book, “Best Evidence,” has emerged as a classic in the field of scientific anomalies reporting since its first publication in 2000. Michael began his writing career as a crime reporter for a suburban Dow-Jones newspaper in Connecticut, and worked as a freelance reporter in Southeast Asia for three years. He has also worked as a stringer for Forbes magazine, and Op-Ed contributor to The Wall Street Journal Asia.

urlThe Witch of Napoli is like an Italian opera full of charming melodrama. The plot, which takes place in 1899, moves forward at a fast pace with suspense that I found impossible to resist. This is a really good writer with a powerful voice. These characters are skillfully drawn, witty, and fun. I especially like how this story becomes visual with vivid descriptions of the history and the cultural adventures.

 

 

////////////////////////////

ibpa-default-article-cover

partner-memberParanormal-Awards-2015

8 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, fiction, Greylock, horror blogs, literary horror, Mt. Greylock, paranormal, Reading Fiction, short story blogs, supernatural, supernatural mysteries, supernatural thrillers

Ghosts on Mt. Greylock

If mountains had eyes, what would they see?

Ghosts? Have you ever met a mountain ghost? Ghosts associated with Mt. Greylock are still the fascination of many hikers and nature lovers. And also for those of us who just plain love ghosts.  Here’s something from Mt. Greylock and the story of The Old Coot of Greylock on Bellows Pipe Trail.

As the Civil War began, a North Adams farmer named William Saunders left home in 1861 to fight for the Union. About a year later, his wife, Belle, received a report that her husband had been gravely wounded and was in a military hospital. That was the last she heard of him. Alone and in need of help, she hired a local man to work the farm with her; later she married the man and he adopted her children. In 1865, a bearded, ragged man, wearing a Union blue uniform, stepped off the train in North Adams. You can guess who had finally returned home. Saunders walked to his farm, and while standing outside he saw his wife and happy family, his children calling another man “daddy.”

Crushed, he turned on his heels and walked away, heading toward Mt. Greylock, where he built a shack in the remote Bellows Pipe. He lived the rest of his days there, almost a hermit, hiring himself out occasionally to farms, known to locals only as the “Old Coot.” War and time had ravaged his appearance and no one recognized him. It’s said that he even worked his old spread on occasion, perhaps sitting down to meals with his family, only he knowing the truth. Folks say the Old Coot was insane, but whether it was caused by the horrors of war or grief at losing his family, no one knows. One winter’s day, hunters came upon the shack to find the Old Coot cold dead. But they were startled to see his spirit fly from his body and head up the mountain. That was the first sighting of the Ghost of the Old Coot, but certainly not the last.

COOT PHOTO

To this day, his bedraggled spirit is sometimes seen on Mt. Greylock, always heading up the mountain, but never coming down. You might say you don’t believe it, but are you brave enough to walk the Bellows Pipe Trail after dark?  [Source: IBerkshires.com, article by Anthony Fyden]

mtgreylockprofile

 

Are mountains haunted? They certainly possess mysterious powers.

birdmusicimages

“Greylock is a stunning mountain, the terrain rolling like a series of

hunchbacks with secret clefts.

Makes one wonder what secrets are buried here.”

 Alexei Georg, Greylock.

///////////////

Watch for more posts here about the spirits that haunt Mt. Greylock.

1 Comment

Filed under fiction, ghost stories, Ghosts, Greylock, Hauntings, Mt. Greylock, Reading Fiction, short story blogs