Category Archives: READING FICTION BLOG Paula Cappa

Author of the Week, Erika Robuck, Jan. 18, 2021

AUTHOR OF THE WEEK   January 18, 2021

 

Erica Robuck

 

Erika Robuck is the national bestselling author of Receive Me Falling, Hemingway’s GirlCall Me ZeldaFallen Beauty, and The House of Hawthorne. She is a contributor to the anthology Grand Central: Original Stories of Postwar Love and Reunion and to the Writer’s Digest essay collection, Author in Progress. In 2014, Robuck was named Annapolis’ Author of the Year, and she resides there with her husband and three sons.

“I believe vulnerability is the key. When we see a character’s fears, anxieties, and self-doubt, they become human and redeemable. Vulnerability is almost always revealed in journals, letters, and photographs. They are treasures and, if I’m able to get my hands on them, key to helping me develop multi-dimensional, empathetic characters.”

 

 

Interview at Jocosa’s Bookshelf:

http://jocosasbookshelf.com/interview-erika-robuck/

Visit her Amazon page:

https://www.amazon.com/Erika-Robuck/e/B005C9TQJU

 

Her forthcoming novel, The Invisible Woman (February 9, 2021, Berkley, Penguin Random House) is about real-life superwoman of WWII, OSS/SOE agent Virginia Hall.

(P.S. I am currently reading House of Hawthorne because I love Nathaniel Hawthorne as a writer and have written about him myself in my ghost short story Between the Darkness and the Dawn. Loving this novel!)

 

Join me in my reading nook and discover an author every week at Reading Fiction Blog! And browse the Index of Authors’ Tales above to find over 200 free short stories by over 100 famous authors.

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Daggers in His Smile

The Golden Bough by Salman Rushdie

Tuesday’s Tale   January 12, 2021

 

“As the interview progressed I became convinced that I would not get the job.”

 

This story opens with a common feeling we’ve all experienced. Knowing your job interview begins and ends nowhere. Whatever failures or miscalculations occurred, after too many disappointments and self-blame, what might you do? How desperate might you become when you experience eternal rejection? And there’s an interesting twist here causing that repeated rejection.  Our narrator David Gularski goes pretty wild.

Author Salman Rushdie is famous for his stylistic magical realism. This fiction has fascinating flavors of dark humor and an ending that will make you grin.

 

Read the short story (10-minute read) at Granta

https://granta.com/the-golden-bough/

 

Watch the film (24 minutes). Worth your time for sure!

 

 

Salman Rushdie is a British-Indian novelist best known for the novels ‘Midnight’s Children’ and ‘The Satanic Verses,’ for which he was accused of blasphemy against Islam. In 1988 Rushdie published The Satanic Verses, a novel drenched in magical realism. He’s written eleven novels and collections of essays and works of non-fiction.

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free reading at Reading Fiction Blog. This is a compendium of over 200 short stories by more than 100 famous storytellers of mystery, suspense, supernatural, ghost stories, ‘quiet horror,’ crime, sci-fi, romance, and mainstream fiction.

 Follow or sign up to join me in reading one short story every month. 

 

Comments are welcome!

Feel free to click “LIKE.”

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

Kirkus Mystery & Thrillers Reviews

Books & Such    Bibliophilica   NewYorkerFictionOnline

 Lovecraft Ezine    HorrorNews.net   Fangoria.com   

Slattery’s Art of Horror Magazine   Chuck Windig’s Terrible Minds

   Horror Novel Reviews    HorrorSociety.com     

Monster Librarian       The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

Literature Blog Directory   

Blog Collection

Blog Top Sites

 

Discover Author of the Week posted on Mondays!

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Author of the Week, Charles Yu, Jan. 11

AUTHOR OF THE WEEK   January 11, 2021

 

Charles Yu

Charles Yu is an American writer, born in 1976,  author of four books, including Interior Chinatown, winner of the 2020 National Book Award. He has been nominated for two Writers Guild of America Awards for his work on the HBO series, Westworld. He has also written for shows on FX, AMC, and HBO. His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New YorkerThe New York TimesThe AtlanticThe Wall Street Journal, and Wired, among other publications. You can find him on Twitter  @charles_yu  

 

“You want to tell a story? Grow a heart. Grow two. Now, with the second heart, smash the first one into bits.”

 

Read his interview The Adjacent Reality at Sonora Review:

The Adjacent Reality: An Interview with Charles Yu

 

 

Discover an Author Every Week at Reading Fiction Blog!

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Author of the Week, Susan Wittig Albert, Jan. 4

AUTHOR OF THE WEEK  January 4, 2021

 

Susan Wittig Albert

 

“Sharing our stories can also be a means of healing. Grief and loss may isolate us, and anger may alienate us. Shared with others, these emotions can be powerfully uniting, as we see that we are not alone, and realize that others weep with us.”

 

Susan Wittig Albert is an American author of mystery novels. She is author of New York Times best-selling the China Bayles series, Thyme of Death, the Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter, and the Darling Dahlias series. Also she wrote memoir, Together, Along: A Memoir of Marriage and Place. She and her husband Bill coauthor a series of Victorian-Edwardian mysteries under the name of Robin Paige. She was born in 1940.

 

Read an interview with the author at this link here at Cozy Mystery:

Susan Wittig Albert Interview

“As a writer, I work in three genres, mystery, historical fiction, and memoir.”

Discover an Author Every Week at Reading Fiction Blog!

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Author of the Week, Vera Brittain, December 29, 2020

To All My Readers here at Reading Fiction Blog.

Going forward into 2021, as readers let’s explore famous authors, both classic and contemporary. Once a week I will post  an Author of the Week and a quotation. Finding new authors and new books can be exciting and informative and I love doing the research. Here is my first Author of the Week. Do let me know if you like this addition to my blog.

AUTHOR OF THE WEEK

 

VERA BRITTAIN

“Politics is the executive expression of human immaturity.”

 

Her best-selling 1933 memoir, Testament of Youth, about WWI became a film.

 

Vera Brittain (1893-1970) documented her experiences as a nurse, in her autobiographical account “Testament of Youth.” She describes how the young nurses worked long hours, in poor conditions. Despite the privations, Vera recounts how she engaged in her duties with great enthusiasm.

 

Visit Vera Brittain Amazon.com page:

https://www.amazon.com/Vera-Brittain/e/B000APT5C4

Watch the trailer for the film

 

Discover an Author Every Week here at Reading Fiction Blog.

 

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The Beauty of Christmas Legends

Saturday’s Tales for Christmas,  December 19, 2020

Shall we go back to our childhood days today? The mythical Santa Claus and his magical sleigh, a sweet babe in a manger who brings love to the world, bright star lights on evergreen trees, festive feasts of meats, sweets, and gingerbread houses, the lonely elf on the shelf, and perhaps a boozy eggnog. One more item we can’t forget are the Christmas legends and fairy tales that make our holidays so warm and memorable.

 

Who doesn’t remember The Little Match Girl by Hans Christian Andersen? If you’ve forgotten this sad but poignant story, you can read it here at American Literature. My mom used to tell us this story every Christmas Eve as we drove around town to see all the Christmas lights.  And, this story is especially dedicated to Grandmas, Nanas, and Gramzies because this is a grandparent story too.

The audio is a real treat. The Little Match Girl was meant to be a read-aloud.

Read it here at American Literature:

https://americanliterature.com/author/hans-christian-andersen/short-story/the-little-match-girl

Listen to the audio storybook read by Ewan McGregor, with page-turning illustrations. Beautiful!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHnDT1SO8sc 

 

There is another Christmas legend, less known and one you may not have read. The Christmas Spider (also known as The Spider’s Gift, The Spider’s Miracle, and other cultural variations), a folktale originally from the Ukraine.

I found this story in an old Christmas book. You will be pleasantly surprised how a story about a spider for Christmas will endear you to these odd little creatures.

Read it here, reproduced from my Christmas Book.

The gray spider worked very hard every day making long strands of silk that he wove into a web in which he caught troublesome flies. But he noticed that everyone turned away from him because, they said, he was so unpleasant to look at with his long crooked legs and furry body. Of course the gray spider didn’t believe that, because he had only the kindliest feelings for everybody.

One day when he was crossing the stream he looked into the water. There he saw himself as he really was. “Oh,” he thought, “I am very unpleasant to look at. I shall keep out of people’s way.” He was very sad and hid himself in the darkest corner of the stable.

There he again began to work as he always had, weaving long strands of silk into webs and catching flies. The donkey and the ox and the sheep who lived in the stable thanked him for his kindness, because now they were no longer bothered with the buzzing flies. That made the spider very happy.

One night, exactly at midnight, the gray spider was awakened by a brilliant light. He looked about and saw that the light came from the manger where a tiny Child lay on the hay. The stable was filled with glory, and over the Child bent a beautiful mother. Behind her stood a man with a staff in his hand, and the ox and the donkey and all the white sheep were down on their knees.

Suddenly a gust of cold wind swept through the stable and the Baby began to weep from the cold. The mother bent over Him but could not cover Him enough to keep Him warm.

The little spider took his silken web and laid it at Mary’s feet (for it was Mary) and Mary took up the web and covered the Baby with it. It was soft as thistledown and as warm as wool. The Child stopped His crying and smiled at the little gray spider.

Then Mary said, “Little gray spider, for this great gift to the Babe you may have anything you wish.”

“Most of all,” said the spider, “I wish to be beautiful.”

“That I cannot give you,” Mary answered. “You must stay as you are for as long as you live. But this I grant you. Whenever anyone sees a spider at evening, he will count it a good omen, and it shall bring him good fortune.”

This made the spider very happy, and to this day, on Christmas Eve, we cover the Christmas tree with “angel’s hair” in memory of the little gray spider and his silken web.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wishing you all the happiest of holidays,  the gift of love, the gift of peace, and the magic of Christmas stories!

 

For one more Christmas story—one of my own creations—stop by my December 7, 2017 blog post for Christmas River Ghost. A ghostly holiday story about family, celebration, coming home, and a Christmas peacock.

“They come—through the icy wind, between the naked trees, walking the bridge, by Eagle Hill River … on Christmas Eve … ”

Read the Christmas River Ghost:

https://paulacappa.wordpress.com/2017/12/07/christmas-river-ghost-by-paula-cappa/ 

 

 

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free reading at Reading Fiction Blog. This is a compendium of over 200 short stories by more than 100 famous storytellers of mystery, suspense, supernatural, ghost stories, ‘quiet horror,’ crime, sci-fi, romance, and mainstream fiction.

 Stop by every month or sign up to follow my blog to read one short story every month. 

 

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Coronavirus, an Infection of Mind, Body, Spirit?

Coronavirus, an Infection of Mind, Body, Spirit?

Monday, December 7, 2020

While I don’t normally review nonfiction books here at Reading Fiction Blog, I am compelled to make an exception this one time. Judith Von Halle’s book The Coronavirus Pandemic, Anthroposophical Perspectives is a read that became for me transformative and inspiring. As I write this today, Covid-19 has spread at the highest rate and speed since it began at the start of 2020. Globally we are at 67 million cases with 1.5 million deaths. In the US, the virus is now the leading cause of death, surpassing heart disease and cancer (282,436 deaths and 14.7+ cases). Below is my review. I hope this opens a window on your understanding of this global event that is devastating human lives all over our planet.

 

BOOK REVIEW

Author Judith Von Halle writes an impressive, and brave, perspective on why the Coronavirus pandemic is happening to us at this time. She addresses the psychological aspects but focuses mostly on spiritual knowledge, spiritual reality, and “spiritual-science.”  The term spiritual-science drew my curiosity. This 100-page book is a monograph that I would often pause in the reading so I could reflect on the somewhat radical ideas. Some readers will find certain insights a bridge too far, as I did at times, but most of it makes convincing sense and offers the reader a unique understanding of Covid-19. Haven’t we all asked, “Why is this happening now? What is really going on here with all this sickness, death, and widespread contagion?” Speculative answers abound out there, but Von Halle points to the world’s present “disposition” as one of the causes. You will find a good deal of Austrian scientist and visionary Rudolph Steiner’s philosophy here. Steiner’s “anthroposophy” is defined a creative educational system that aims to optimize physical and mental well-being. Much of Halle’s book reflects this spiritual-scientific research.

Von Halle asks, What entities stand behind the virus and why is it affecting humans? What measures can we take to prevent it? Most importantly, what does this crisis mean to individuals and the world community? She answers all of these beginning with “There is the individual karma, the karma of a people, and the karma of humanity. In the case of Covid-19 all three are undeniably involved.”  Von Halle instructs that because this is a pandemic event, the karma of humanity is at stake.

“What are the spiritual causes for the origins of the pandemic?”  According to Von Halle’s research, the cause is “materialism, which has spread out over the entire earth, —and especially in humanity’s predominantly materialistic way of thinking.”

She explains this mindset: “Humanity as such has developed a ‘disposition’ for illness by this virus in that it has promoted and cherished materialism in its thinking for the past 150 years …. Today mankind is trapped within a degenerate development, because it does not accept and nurture spiritual life with sufficient dedication.”  The historical perspective on this is fascinating, from Europe’s recent “march of materialism” to back in time to other widespread infections like leprosy, cholera, typhus, anthrax, smallpox, tuberculosis, and the Spanish flu in 1918.

For Covid-19, she includes a description of the medical symptoms and their psychological components (the infection causing rigidity of the lungs that fail to absorb oxygen, which aligns with the fixed and obsessive materialistic thinking). The breathing apparatus grows stiff when “a life of free thinking is no longer possible.”

The second half of the book moves on to the fears and psychological aspects of the pandemic regarding social separation and isolation. She follows this with simple soul exercises targeting “the true, the beautiful, and the good.” Such prayerful thoughts were wonderfully comforting and inspiring for me.

At the end, the question arises, will we be victorious spirits in our world? Or will more pandemics occur to provide another opportunity to focus on our spirituality and develop our souls to achieve in our hearts “the true, the beautiful, and the good.” What is abundantly clear is that if you or family members are struggling with the effects of coronavirus, these 109 pages might bring meaning and purpose to your healing. If you are healthy and stable, this book can shatter the old destructive beliefs and shine a bright light into your life’s purpose in the world. Even if you disagree entirely with Halle’s perspectives and research, you will take away a deeper sense of yourself to your fellow man and the unifying elements of life on this planet. Most of her writing is heartfelt and intelligent and will undoubtedly provoke positive thoughts into the most narrowest of minds about consciousness, self-knowledge, and soul development. The world soul may very well be on a path to spiritual rebirth. Highly recommended.

On Amazon.com

“Revealing unexpected perspectives to the COVID-19 pandemic, Judith von Halle asks urgent and difficult questions and offers shattering insights for humankind’s future development.”

Some Amazon Reviews of Von Halle’s books:

“I find Judith Von Halle to be one of the most credible living authors I’ve encountered, and at the same time she seems to be amongst the least understood (I don’t think this is her fault). Some things take awhile to understand, and understanding the life we’re living seems to take the longest. I am so appreciative of J. Von Halle’s contribution.”

“Love all Judith von Halle’s books. Her insight is truly unique and truthful.”

 

JUDITH VON HALLE, born in Berlin in 1972, attended school in Germany and the USA and subsequently studied architecture, graduating in 1998. She first encountered anthroposophy in 1997, and began working as a member of staff at Rudolf Steiner House in Berlin, where she also lectured from 2001. In addition she had her own architectural practice. In 2004 she received the stigmata, which transformed her life. Her first book was published in German in 2005, and she now works principally as a lecturer and author. She lives in Berlin with her husband.

Temple Lodge Publishing, U.K.  https://www.templelodge.com/

 

 

 Rudolf Steiner

 Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925), read his biography here at Encyclopedia of World Biographies. Steiner remains an imperfectly understood and often controversial figure.
https://www.notablebiographies.com/supp/Supplement-Sp-Z/Steiner-Rudolf.html 

 

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Bullet In the Brain

Bullet In the Brain  by Tobias Wolff  (1995)

Tuesday’s Tale of Suspense   November 24, 2020

Murder, nostalgia, understanding life. Bullet In the Brain is a fast read (15-minutes), unforgettable, and will draw you into the story immediately and hard. Do you love stories that explore language? Author Tobias Wolff has a reputation as a sharp academic. In this story, Wolff has crafted his narrative with fast tension and then redirects into an irresistible slow motion that keeps the readers hanging on every sentence. Truly a master writer.

Anders, a bitter literary critic by trade (a lover of literature), walks into a bank. He engages the other customers with sarcasm and wit when two bank robbers enter the front doors. For Anders, language has always provoked wonder (he is quite the entertaining logophile)—but  a jaded one. You’ll love the cynicism laced with humor. In this story Anders discovers that even danger holds a disdain for him. Read it slowly to enjoy Wolff’s chills, the humor, and this extraordinary character who jumps off the page into your mind. Savor the last lines. Say them aloud, because they have quite a slap.

Read it here:

https://pov.imv.au.dk/Issue_27/section_1/artc2A.html

Listen to the audio here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtcQ_Uk47MI

 

 

Tobias Wolf is the author of novels The Barracks Thief and Old School, the memoirs This Boy’s Life and In Pharaoh’s Army. Also short story collections In the Garden of the North American MartyrsBack in the World, and The Night in Question. His Our Story Begins, won The Story Prize, 2008, and he received the PEN/Malamud Award and the Rea Award, both for excellence in the short story, and the PEN/Faulkner Award. His work appears regularly in The New YorkerThe AtlanticHarper’s, and other magazines and literary journals.

 

Listen to an short interview with Tobias Wolff speak about short stories:

 

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free reading at Reading Fiction Blog. This is a compendium of over 200 short stories by more than 100 famous storytellers of mystery, suspense, supernatural, ghost stories, ‘quiet horror,’ crime, sci-fi, romance, and mainstream fiction.

 Follow or sign up to join me in

reading one short story every month. 

 

Comments are welcome!

Feel free to click “LIKE.”

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

Kirkus Mystery & Thrillers Reviews

Books & Such    Bibliophilica   NewYorkerFictionOnline

 Lovecraft Ezine    HorrorNews.net   Fangoria.com   

Slattery’s Art of Horror Magazine 

  Chuck Windig’s Terrible Minds

   Horror Novel Reviews    HorrorSociety.com     

Monster Librarian       The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

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Filed under crime stories, crime thrillers, fiction, fiction bloggers, flash fiction, free short stories, free short stories online, literary short stories, literature, murder mystery, mysteries, Reading Fiction, READING FICTION BLOG Paula Cappa, short stories, short stories online, short story blogs, suspense, tales of terror

Ghost at the Threshold

Sir Edmund Orne  by Henry James (1891)

Tuesday’s Ghost Story for Halloween   October 27, 2020

Reading a ghost story during Halloween week is always a good idea. Sometimes it’s fascinating to go back to the classic authors who are so different from, and I dare say refreshing, our modern ghost writers. And who better to read than author Henry James. He’s known for his psychological realism and emotionally powerful ghost stories. Reading his novels and short stories is often an experience as in the famous Turn of the Screw. In 1903, James gave advice on how to read his work. He suggested you read a few pages a day and not break the thread  “The thread is really stretched quite scientifically tight. Keep along with it step by step — & the full charm will come out.”

There is literary magic in his stories. Reading his work slowly so the imagination can peak and run is a worthwhile effort.

In Sir Edmund Orne, we have a lovely coquette named Charlotte Marden and her mysterious mother Mrs. Marden who has “intuitions.” The story opens on a quiet sunny Sunday in Brighton, is full of romance, intrigue, and of course a ghost on a mission. The story is more quiet mystery than horror but unsettling and holds the suspense all the way through.

From our determined and charming narrator …

“I felt beneath my feet the threshold of the strange door, in my life, which had suddenly been thrown open and out of which unspeakable vibrations played up through me like a fountain. I had heard all my days of apparitions, but it was a different thing to have seen one and to know that I should in all probability see it familiarly, as it were, again.”

 

Read the story at East of the Web:

http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/EdmuOrme.shtml

Listen to audio at Librivox Recordings:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43FaG7G5Rj0

 

Henry James was an American novelist and critic.  He wrote 20 novels, 112 tales, and 12 plays  and volumes of travel writing and criticism.  He is best remembered for his The Portrait of a Lady (1881) and the novella The Turn of the Screw (1898).

 

 

The Haunting of Bly Manor, a Netflix anthology series is a twist on Turn of the Screw. 

 

 

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

 

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free reading at Reading Fiction Blog. This is a compendium of over 200 short stories by more than 100 famous storytellers of mystery, suspense, supernatural, ghost stories, ‘quiet horror,’ crime, sci-fi, romance, and mainstream fiction.

 Follow or sign up to join me in reading one short story every month. 

Comments are welcome!

Feel free to click “LIKE.”

 

Other Reading Web Sites to Visit

Kirkus Mystery & Thrillers Reviews

Books & Such    Bibliophilica   NewYorkerFictionOnline

 Lovecraft Ezine    HorrorNews.net   Fangoria.com   

Slattery’s Art of Horror Magazine  

Chuck Windig’s Terrible Minds

   Horror Novel Reviews    HorrorSociety.com     

Monster Librarian       The Story Reading Ape Blog

For Authors/Writers:  The Writer Unboxed

Literature Blog Directory   

Blog Collection

Blog Top Sites

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Mary Shelley Anniversary Birth Date, August 30, 1797

Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley

Celebrating Mary Shelley’s Birth Date,  August 30, 1797

“Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void, but out of chaos …”  Mary Shelley

Every year, the most ardent Mary Shelley fans remember this author on August 30. Frankenstein is still one of the most popular and enduring novels since its publication in 1818. We spend time reading her short stories and browsing her biographies, maybe  discovering a new fact about her life and writing.

Did you know Frankenstein was inspired by a nightmare? In the preface of the third edition of the novel, Mary says that Frankenstein came to her in a dream. During a sleepless night in her dark room, behind closed shutters “with the moonlight struggling to get through … I saw with shut eyes, but acute mental vision – I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life …”

In 2018, The New Yorker Magazine published a stunning piece The Strange and Twisted Life of Frankenstein by Jill Lapore, a history professor at Harvard. Lapore writes …

‘Like the creature pieced together from cadavers collected by Victor Frankenstein, her name was an assemblage of parts: the name of her mother, the feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, stitched to that of her father, the philosopher William Godwin, grafted onto that of her husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, as if Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley were the sum of her relations, bone of their bone and flesh of their flesh, if not the milk of her mother’s milk, since her mother had died eleven days after giving birth to her, mainly too sick to give suck—Awoke and found no mother.’

You can read more of this fascinating piece at this link: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/02/12/the-strange-and-twisted-life-of-frankenstein 

 

The novel, as most of you know, is about Dr. Victor Frankenstein, the monster’s creator. For Mary, the Frankenstein name was an inspiration from Castle Frankenstein in Germany. Some biographers note that alchemist Johann Conrad Dippel lived at Castle Frankenstein and was likely the inspiration behind Doctor Frankenstein.

 

As an additional bonus in remembering Mary Shelley on this anniversary, I am offering my short story, Beyond Castle Frankenstein, as a Kindle Single FREE on Amazon (also FREE via Smashwords online for ibooks, Barnes&Noble, Kobo, PDF, epub, and more).

Beyond Castle Frankenstein was originally published in Journals of Horror, Found Fiction, edited by Terry M. West, at Pleasant Storm Entertainment, Inc.

Here is a recent review of Beyond Castle Frankenstein:

“Historical fact and fiction blend in an evocative and atmospheric tale of a romantic triangle, love and jealousy that transcends death, and a haunted protagonist; but is Mary Shelley truly haunted by the shade of her predecessor as Shelley’s wife–or by her own guilt? Using the literary conceit of a “found fiction,” accomplished and award-winning author Cappa skillfully crafts a work as macabre as any of her protagonist’s own creations.  Not to be missed by readers who are Shelley fans; but most readers of supernatural fiction will appreciate this e-story whether they’re Shelley fans or not.” Werner Lind, author of the vampire novella Lifeblood, award-winning short fiction, avid book reviewer, and a librarian with published scholarly articles.

 

Download for FREE here on Amazon.com

 

Download for FREE here on Smashwords.com

Do leave a comment here if you read the story. I have just reprinted it June of this year for Kindle Single and in need of reader response. I would love to hear your thoughts!

 

Mary and Percy Bysshe Shelley’s home in Italy.

On this blog, in the above INDEX OF AUTHORS’ TALES, you will find five short stories by Mary Shelley, and her famous essay of 1824 On Ghosts.

 

Watch the film Mary Shelley by IFC Films staring Elle Fanning, Bel Powley, Tom Sturridge, Jack Hickey, Joanna Froggatt, Ben Hardy, and Stephen Dillane. Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour.

Don’t forget to view the INDEX above of more free reading at Reading Fiction Blog. This is a compendium of over 200 short stories by more than 100 famous storytellers of mystery, suspense, supernatural, ghost stories, ‘quiet horror,’ crime, sci-fi, romance, and mainstream fiction.

 Follow or sign up to join me in reading one short story every month. 

 

Comments are welcome!

Feel free to click “LIKE.”

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